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Solar Eclipse visible from Malta

Animation_solar_eclipse_of_March_20,_2015 A total solar eclipse will occur on Friday March 20, 2015. However, only a partial solar eclipse will be visible from Malta.

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the Earth and the Sun, thereby obscuring, partly or totally, the image of the Sun for someone who is situated on Earth and turning day into darkness.

WARNING: Never view the sun with the naked eye or with any optical device, such as binoculars or a telescope!

How to view a solar eclipse in a safe way

TSE2015Mar20T-animated-gifhe only populated places where the 20th March total eclipse can be can seen, are the Faroe Islands and Svalbard. Seen from Malta, the moon will block only 38% of the sun. The start of the partial eclipse will be at 09:21, with the maximum eclipse occurring at 10:25 am. The end of the partial eclipse is at 11:33am.

This is the last total solar eclipse visible in Europe until the eclipse of August 12, 2026.

At the end of its path, the shadow of the Moon rises from the Earth’s surface to space at the north pole.

Solar-Eclipse-seen-from-Gharghur-Malta

How to view a solar eclipse in a safe way!

The only way to view the partially eclipsed Sun safely is to project or filter the Sun’s rays. Some safe options:

Pinhole projector: An easy and cheap way to view the Sun is to project its image to a screen, such as a sheet of white paper or cardboard. Projection works well with or without a telescope or binoculars. However, don’t look through the telescope’s eyepiece or side-mounted finder scope while projecting the Sun’s image to a screen. Read this article to learn how to make a DIY pinhole projector

Eclipse glasses: Check with a local astronomy club for where to rent or buy eclipse glasses.

Welder’s goggles: These can be found at your local welding supply store. NASA recommends welder’s googles rated 14 or higher.

Aluminised Mylar sheeting: Aluminised Mylar sheets can be easily cut with scissors and can be used to see a partial eclipse of the sun.

Sources: Nasa, Wikipedia, Google Maps, timeanddate.com

WARNING: Never view the sun with the naked eye or with any optical device, such as binoculars or a telescope!